The Man Who Would Be King

The Man Who Would Be King

DVD - 2010
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Based on a Rudyard Kipling story and packed with spectacle, humor, excitement and bold twists of fate, John Huston's film of The Man Who Would be King earns its crown as "an epic like no other. One of the screen's great adventure yarns" (Danny Peary, Guide for the Film Fanatic). Sean Connery and Michael Caine -- chins out, shoulders squared and with a sly wink -- star as British Sargeants Danny Dravot and Peachy Carnehan. The Empire was built by men like these two. Now they're out to build their own empire, venturing into remote Kafiristan to become rich as kings-- Container
Publisher: Burbank, CA : Warner brothers Entertainment , 2010
ISBN: 9780780663916
0780663918
Branch Call Number: DVD Man
Characteristics: 1 videodisc (129 min.) : sd., col., ; 4 3/4 in

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j
jimg2000
Aug 05, 2017

British idioms throughout make subtitles useful if not essential. Professional critics loved it ... who in their right mind dared to slight the story writer, director and actors, all celebrated masters of their trades:
7.9/10 IMDb
96% Rotten Tomatoes
4/4 Roger Ebert

From Wikipedia: The Man Who Would Be King is a 1975 Technicolor film adapted from the Rudyard Kipling novella of the same title. It was adapted and directed by John Huston and starred Sean Connery, Michael Caine, Saeed Jaffrey, and Christopher Plummer as Kipling (giving a name to the novella's anonymous narrator). The film follows two rogue ex-non-commissioned officers of the Indian Army who set off from late 19th-century British India in search of adventure and end up as kings of Kafiristan. (Read the first paragraphs in Kipling's book that was published in 1888.)

t
TheeAvebury
Apr 19, 2017

One of John Huston's best films- with great performances by Connery and Caine- and a rollicking adventure yarn based on Rudyard Kipling's story.

p
patch666
Mar 19, 2017

Classic !!! Connery and Caine are amazing and so funny together

i
IV27HUjg
Jun 11, 2015

Always entertaining!

a
akirakato
Mar 16, 2015

This is a 1975 adventure directed by John Huston, based on the Rudyard Kipling short story of the same title.
The film follows two rogue ex-non-commissioned officers of the Indian Army who set off from late 19th-century British India in search of adventure and end up as kings of Kafiristan.
It's a fascinating and thrilling escapist entertainment.
Sean Connery and Michael Caine star as British Sargeants Danny Dravot and Peachy Carnehan.
The holy men are convinced that Danny is the son of "Sikander" (Alexander the Great).
The local people hail him as god-king.
Despite Peachy's strong warnings, however, Danny decides to take a wife after seeing the beautiful Roxanne.
Roxanne, having a superstitious fear that she will burst into flames if she consorts with a god, tries frantically to escape, biting Danny during the wedding ceremony.
The bite draws blood, and when everyone sees it, they realize that Danny is human after all.
At the near-closing scene, Danny is forced to walk to the middle of a rope bridge over a deep gorge as the ropes are cut.
To your amazement, Danny played by Sean Connery actually falls into the bottom of the gorge.
At first, I thought that a stunt man did replace this falling Danny, but Sean Connery himself actually falls down to the bottom.
To find out how it was done, look at the "The Making of the film."
It is really amazing!

l
lukasevansherman
Nov 05, 2014

A rousing adventure movie based on a short Rudyard Kipling story. Sean Connery and Michael Caine are two roguish ex-soldiers in India who journey to a remote country and set themselves up as kings in order to plunder the country, but Connery, taken for a god, embraces his role. The movie is more satiric than Kipling's story and the mix of humor and adventure would have a huge influence on Indiana Jones and the like. Connery and Caine have such a great rapport, that it's really too bad they didn't work together again. John Huston directs and Christopher Plummer plays Kipling. Great fun.

g
garycornell
Oct 08, 2014

"The Man Who Would Be King" is one of Director John Huston's finest movies. This 1975 masterpiece was filmed in beautiful India and you get to travel throughout the country. Cinematographer Oswald Morris captures not only the beauty of the surroundings, but the beauty of its people. Sean Connery and Michael Caine are the British adventurers seeking to establish themselves as deities in the province of Kafiristand. Christopher Plummer plays Rudyard Kipling at the beginning and end of the movie. The amazing part of the movie is the great script which John Huston help write. You are drawn into the story and once it has you, don't let anyone bother you. One of my favorite all time films is going to be "The Man Who Would Be King". The book is one of Rudyard Kipling's finest stories and John Huston made sure the movie would be an epic masterpiece. Let me know how you like the film right here on the KCLS web site. I would love to hear your comments. Did I get it right?

nfentonn Aug 11, 2014

Why do people need to read a political message into every movie? It'a a movie. Entertaining, but I've been a sucker about movies about the Raj since Gunga Din. Had a Great Uncle by marriage in the Indian(British Army in India)Army. My Greatgrandfather kicked him out of the family and then came to America. Go figure.

m
Monolith
Sep 19, 2012

It's nice that John Huston was able to see this to fruition, being that he shelved the project for some twenty-odd years, because his original intention for the leads were Bogart and Gable. Unfortunately, they passed away. Caine and Connery are terrific -- great chemistry. Plummer as well, as brief as his role is. (FYI -- The exotic beauty who played Roxanne was Michael Caine's real wife, Shakira.) Good movie.

aaa5756 Jul 26, 2012

It was O.K for a home TV movie. I was entertained and interesting. But it was NOT worth the long library wait or the price to rent from a Red Box. "I fast forwarded a lot but not all the way.”

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Quotes

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j
jimg2000
Aug 05, 2017

They've twigged it, Danny.
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the Order of the Garter.
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you'll catch fire, I warrant.
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You have permission to bugger off!
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Cut and run while the running's good.
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I pronounce a recess in this durbar.
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God's holy trousers!
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jewels in the Tower of London
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It ain't brass, Danny.
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dropped like he was poleaxed!
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...or I'll have their guts for garters!
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Where's your high panjandrum?
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Polish our buttons, stuff ramrods up our jacksies and look bold.
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Have you gone starky?
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Give her a hat with a feather, and no girl in Brighton on bank holiday... could hold a candle to her.

j
jimg2000
Aug 05, 2017

Oh, no. Indeed, by Jove, no.
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Maybe we're missing a bet.
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That's the bloke Kipling told us about.
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Not too bad for the back of beyond.
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A gold coin worn pretty thin.
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worth a fiver at least.
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All right. Up you get. Off your hunkers. No more grovelling.
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Acting like a green lieutenant... hoping to be mentioned in dispatches!
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One look at your foolish faces...tells me you're going to be crack troops.
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Now, listen to me, you benighted muckers.
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When we're done, you'll be able to slaughter enemies like civilized men!
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Tell His Majesty we've also taken a vow not to dally with females... till all his enemies are vanquished.
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You wouldn't know them from the Gaiety Chorus.
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Englishmans. How they name dogs, take off hats to womans... and march left, right with rifles on their shoulders.
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You just wait one jiffy.
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Bloody cheek. Where's their gratitude?

j
jimg2000
Aug 05, 2017

McCrimmon got his sporran shot off? Half a crown was in it, right?
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It drops into nothing below, straight as a beggar can spit!
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Blokes twice our size standing guarding the snow, like.
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The country was mountainous... and the mules was most contrary.
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Now, the problem is... how to divide five Afghans from three mules... and have two Englishmen left over.
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he'd sat down on an anthill in his kilt unknowing.
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Last time Danny and me came through the Khyber Pass, we fought our way... yard by bloody yard...
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Morning to you, brother.
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Crikey!
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Our forward continuance is impeded by this fellow, who is begging...
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Don't stand on politeness. If you want to go to bed, we won't steal anything.
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"Want to vanquish your foes?"
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We're going to another place... where a man isn't crowded and can come into his own.

j
jimg2000
Aug 05, 2017

You should have gone home after your army service.
-To what? A porter's uniform outside a restaurant? Tips for closing cab doors on civilians and their blowzy women? Not for us, after watching Afghans take command... when the officers had copped it!
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Never could understand how pukka chaps like you can go about... wearing aprons and sashes and shaking hands with strangers.
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Filled her with peppers and flogged her to death.
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Yes, and he'll tumble.
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I have an educated taste in whiskey, women, waistcoats and bills of fare.
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They usually have long noses for looking down at you.
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Riding in this ash-cart is like being kicked by a mule every 10 minutes!
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Writer of correspondence for the illiterate general public.

j
jimg2000
Aug 05, 2017

Peachy, in your opinion... have our lives been misspent?
-Well, that depends on how you look at it. The world's not a better place because of us. No, hardly that. Nobody's gonna weep at our demise. And who'd want them to? And we haven't many good deeds to our credit.
-None. None to brag about.
But how many have been where we've been... and seen what we've seen?
-Bloody few. And that's a fact.
Even now, I wouldn't change places with the viceroy himself... if it meant giving up my memories.
-Me neither.
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Detriments you call us? Detriments? Well I want to remind you it was "detriments" like us that built this bloody Empire *and* the Izzat of the bloody Raj, 'ats on!

j
jimg2000
Aug 05, 2017

And Peachy come home in about a year... and the mountains they tried to fall on old Peachy... but he was quite safe because Daniel walked before him. And Daniel never let go of Peachy's hand. And Peachy never let go
of Daniel's head.
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Can you forgive me?
-That I can, and that I do, Danny. Free and full and without let or hindrance.
Everything's all right, then.
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And old Danny fell round and round and round and round... like a penny whirligig. Twenty thousand miles! It took him half an hour to fall before he struck the rocks.

m
Monolith
Sep 19, 2012

Daniel Dravot/Peachy Carnehan: "God's holy trousers!"

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j
jimg2000
Aug 05, 2017

Read the first paragraphs in Kipling's book that was published in 1888:

   “Brother to a Prince and fellow to a beggar if he be found worthy.” The Law, as quoted, lays down a fair conduct of life, and one not easy to follow. I have been fellow to a beggar again and again under circumstances which prevented either of us finding out whether the other was worthy. I have still to be brother to a Prince, though I once came near to kinship with what might have been a veritable King and was promised the reversion of a Kingdom—army, law–courts, revenue and policy all complete. But, to–day, I greatly fear that my King is dead, and if I want a crown I must go and hunt it for myself.

The beginning of everything was in a railway train upon the road to Mhow from Ajmir. There had been a deficit in the Budget, which necessitated travelling, not Second–class, which is only half as dear as First–class, but by Intermediate, which is very awful indeed. There are no cushions in the Intermediate class, and the population are either Intermediate, which is Eurasian, or native, which for a long night journey is nasty; or Loafer, which is amusing though intoxicated. Intermediates do not patronize refreshment–rooms. They carry their food in bundles and pots, and buy sweets from the native sweetmeat–sellers, and drink the roadside water. That is why in the hot weather Intermediates are taken out of the carriages dead, and in all weathers are most properly looked down upon. My particular Intermediate happened to be empty till I reached Nasirabad, when a huge gentleman in shirt–sleeves entered, and, following the custom of Intermediates, passed the time of day. He was a wanderer and a vagabond like myself, but with an educated taste for whiskey.

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