"Thus the expeditionary forces against the barbarians prepares for its campaign, ravaging the earth, wasting our patrimony."
A powerful, disturbing, and resonant tale from the South African Nobel laureate J.M. Coetzee. Coetzee takes on one of the great themes of the 20th century: empire. Told in the first person by an unnamed magistrate in a colonial town, the book interrogates the myths of empire and imperialism and the way it infects both those involved in spreading it and its victims (the "barbarians" of the title). There are echoes of writers like Conrad, Orwell, and Greene, all of whom explored similar territories, but it may Kafka who is the key influence on Coetzee and his work as the same allegorical power and strangeness as the melancholy Czech. Also see "Disgrace" and "Life and Time of Michael K." "It's the fault of Empire!"

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