Being a reader who usually doesn’t overly question the science and facts behind the plot of a fiction book, I felt the need to during this read as I began to feel a mixed sense of puzzlement and interest when Mia was diagnosed with synesthesia. At first, I thought it was a bit basic to base off a book on a rare condition, especially one of which that doesn’t awfully seem like a daily hassle but rather a gift. However, Wendy Mass went beyond that concept and portrayed a powerful message about having a healthy self-image and finding the positive in a negative, which I applaud her for as her readers are often young. Bringing such lessons into the open for young readers is incredible as it makes them aware of the personal struggles they may face in the future. Although Mia’s condition wasn’t directly about her image, she had trouble accepting the fact that it wasn’t normal to match colours with numbers or shapes. Halfway through the novel, she began to embrace her condition and understood that synesthesia was always going to be her idea of “normal”. All in all, Wendy Mass shone a light on an incredibly moving fiction story which promotes a positive attitude towards imperfections and limitations. Rating: 3.5/5
- @BiggerPictureReviews of the Teen Review Board of the Hamilton Public Library

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